10 reasons to choose Box hedging

Buxus sempervirens, more commonly known as Box hedging, is one of Best4hedging’s top 5 bestselling species, and it’s easy to see why. The huge range of features that Box hedging offers makes it a great choice for a variety of different uses, with Box being most popularly used for formal hedging, low borders, parterres, knot gardens and path edging – and, not forgetting its frequent use as topiary.

If all that isn’t enough to make you see why Buxus is a fantastic hedging choice, we’ve got 10 more reasons to help change your mind…

1. Plant your Box hedging anywhere in your garden and it will thrive – it’s tolerant of all soil types and planting positions (it’s best to avoid very waterlogged or boggy sites though).

2. Once established, Buxus sempervirens is drought tolerant, so you don’t have to worry if you forget to water every once in a while.

3. As Box is a native species, it reflects the biodiversity of local natural spaces, attracting a variety of insects including bees that appear in the spring to pollinate the small, modest flowers.

 
Ladybird on Box hedge

4. Buxus sempervirens is a slow growing hedging species, achieving only about 10-15cm a year – this makes it very low maintenance.

5. Most hedging species are available in a range of root types, however, Box is the only hedging available in root ball form year-round due to its strong root system.

6. Buxus is an extremely long living species. Box plants have been known to live for hundreds of years!

7. Buxus sempervirens is easy to prune – trimming twice a year, once in June and again in autumn, is all the maintenance it needs. And, if you wet the leaves before pruning, the cut ends will heal quicker, helping to prevent disease.

 
Pruning Box hedging

8. Box is an evergreen species giving you year-round, glossy green foliage.

9. Box hedging is available in a range of different plant sizes, so whether you want a low border or a medium hedging screen, there is a Box plant to suit.

10. The small, compact and attractive foliage of Box makes it great for topiary.

Facts you probably don’t know about Box hedging 

1. If you ever find yourself faced with an old, overgrown or neglected Box hedge, don’t worry, this species is easy to save! Buxus responds well to hard pruning and can even be cut back to within 30cm of the ground. Box hedges will recover well and quickly bounce back to their best.

1. If you ever find yourself faced with an old, overgrown or neglected Box hedge, don’t worry, this species is easy to save! Buxus responds well to hard pruning and can even be cut back to within 30cm of the ground. Box hedges will recover well and quickly bounce back to their best.
 
Low Box border

2. Many gardeners wait until the first week of June to trim their Buxus, following an old gardening tradition that advises, ‘Don’t trim your box hedge until Derby Day’.

3. Box hedging was hugely popular during the Renaissance period and was often found in the gardens of the European elite.

4. In Folklore, it was believed that Box hedges could prevent witches from entering your house or stealing your plants – The story follows that witches knew every twig and leaf of every plant; however, the small, compact foliage of box confused any witches that tried to count the leaves. The witch would continuously lose her place when counting the leaves of the box planted outside your house, causing her to be distracted from entering. The same was said of Buxus Sempervirens planted around a flower bed, the confusion caused by the dense foliage would lead her to forget about stealing your plants.

5. In the past, the leaves of Buxus sempervirens were boiled together with sawdust and lye (a strong alkali) to create auburn coloured hair dye.

 

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